A Coming Attraction of a Different Sort

The holiday hustle and bustle is affecting a lot of us (and a lot of you, too, I bet!), but though 2018 still has nineteen days left as I pen these words, it’s not too early to be looking forward to 2019. The year ahead will offer the next chapters in such long-running series as For Better of For Worse, Little Orphan Annie, Dick Tracy, and Superman (among others), plus some surprising new releases. It will all be building up to an extra-special milestone that, in this day of social media and minimalist message content, might be designated “D4200.”

More on exactly what that means coming in January, when we inaugurate a new monthly feature in this space: The LOAC Wheel of Fortune!

Sure, it may not look like much now, but when we load it with content and give it a whirl next month and in the months thereafter, we think you’ll enjoy the results. What we can tell you right now is that this LOAC Wheel of Fortune has nothing to do with the TV Wheel of Fortune, on which my wife was a contestant earlier this year (discussed as the lead item in this May posting).

For now, however, here’s wishing all visitors to this space a happy last few weeks of 2018!

Episode 012 with special guest Bruce Canwell

Bruce Canwell and Kurtis Findlay are back for another episode of the Library of American Comics & EuroComics Podcast!

Bruce and Kurtis talk about the newly released Little Orphan Annie, Vol. 15: 1950-1951, take a look back at Jack Kent’s King Aroo, Vol. 1, and recall the secret origins of the Library of American Comics!

Subscribe on iTunes

November Nibbles Before Turkey-Day Gobbles

It’s an honor, but never a joyous task, to pen a remembrance for a luminary in this artform who has left us, as I recently did for Stan Lee. Thinking about Stan’s passing in the days that followed, it led me to wonder, “What upbeat comics milestones are attached to the month of November?” The 90th anniversary of the creation of Mickey Mouse is getting wide-spread — and justly deserved — recognition, but I found another handful of items that put a smile on my lips …

For instance, Sesame Street‘s inimitable Cookie Monster marks November 2nd as his birthday. Here he is, doing what he does best, in this 1973 installment of the Sesame Street newspaper strip:

Writer Alan Moore was born November 18, 1953. While his credits are many, varied, and often exceptionally fine, I have a sentimental fondness for his work with Steve Bissette and John Totleben (and sometimes Rick Veitch) on DC’s Swamp Thing.

Continue Reading →

Face Front, One Last Time

Though not unexpected, it is certainly sad to mark the passing of Stanley Martin Lieber, known the world over as Stan Lee, at age ninety-five.

“Silver Age Stan,” circa the mid-1970s

Much has already been written about Stan’s career while he was with us, and his obituary is appearing everywhere, including The New York TimesThe Hollywood ReporterThe Comics ReporterBBC News, and elsewhere.

I met Stan once, at a Boston convention, along with my good friend Mike Dudley. Stan was gracious to all, and personalized a bit of Fantastic Four memorabilia for Mike that had been previously autographed by both “King” Kirby and Joe Sinnott.

Stan in his later years, when the public-at-large knew him primarily through his movie cameo appearances.

And of course, in recent years I interviewed Stan in association with our own Amazing Spider-Man newspaper strip collections. Stan was forthright and upbeat, and as we wrapped up our twenty-minute session he told me, “You’re a good interviewer, and I wish you a lot of a lot of luck with those books.” A cynic might say he was only being polite, but it was a pleasant moment for me, to have a man whose work brought me years of enjoyment give his brief connection with me a thumbs-up.

It’s natural to want to speak of one’s own brushes with a passing Great, but it also seems right to me to use this occasion to let The Man speak for himself. Here is Stan, on the Soapbox that was familiar to so many of us in our formative years, delivering a message at least as relevant today as it was when it was first published, almost a half-century ago:

Speaking for everyone at The Library of American Comics, our most sincere sympathies are extended to Stan’s surviving brother, Larry Lieber (himself just recently retired from drawing the Spider-Man newspaper comic), and Stan’s daughter, Joan (J.C.) Lee.

Rest in peace, Mr. Lee.

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes