Al Williamson and Archie Goodwin’s SECRET AGENT CORRIGAN!

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In case anyone out there thought the 1930s and 1940s had exclusive domain over the best adventure strips of all time, we offer for your consideration one of the greatest of them all…from the 1960s to 1980s!

In 1967, famed EC artist Al Williamson teamed with Archie Goodwin, the greatly admired writer and Editor-in-Chief at Warren magazines, to take over the long-running and somewhat tired X-9 series. It was a team that was made in sequential art heaven: Archie and Al had a magnificent 13-year run on the strip, and they teamed again later for wonderful work on Star Wars.

In July, we’ll begin reprinting their entire X-9 run in five volumes under the title X9: Secret Agent Corrigan. It’s the first comprehensive collection of the strip and will be printed from Al Williamson’s personal proofs in an oversized format that matches our Rip Kirby series by Alex Raymond.

“Al Williamson’s delicate line-work, coupled with a style that’s both realistic and atmospheric, enhances the no-nonsense story of Phil Corrigan,” says IDW’s Scott Dunbier, who’s editing the series. And I would add that Archie Goodwin’s unerring sense of pacing, which he developed in comic books, is even more noticeable in the daily strip format. Man, the guy could write!

Secret Agent Corrigan updates the character created in 1934 by Dashiell Hammett and Alex Raymond. X-9 was originally an agent known only by his code name, who worked for an unknown government agency. Over the years, the series benefited from the individual styles of many writers and artists—including Leslie Charteris (author of The Saint novels), Charles Flanders, Mel Graff, Bob Lubbers, and George Evans—but it is the Goodwin/Williamson tenure that is best-loved by today’s comics fans. It was during their run that X-9 received the name of Phil Corrigan.

The first volume also features an introduction by Mark Schultz, and a essay on X-9’s long history by Bruce Canwell.

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