Author Archive | Dean Mullaney

Friday Night Game Night take two…

IMG_0609

Well, we kinda went board game crazy over the weekend. Not being able to decide which of the three games to play, we decided to play them all.

FRIDAY NIGHT was devoted to the 1937 Terry and the Pirates game from Whitman (the same folks who gave us Big Little Books). It’s basically “Parcheesi” for Caniffites. A lot of fun. It’s also interesting to be in Terry and Pat’s world when Dale Scott was the female lead, before Normandie and Burma entered the scene. WE know what’s ahead for the boys, even though they don’t! Ah, the joy of discovery ahead…

SATURDAY NIGHT found us on a quest for treasure in the 1933  Little Orphan Annie game. Pretty simple stuff that reminded me of playing “Candyland” when I was a young child. You shouldn’t expect anything too complicated from a premium from Ovaltine for the Annie radio show. The game went quickly and we were soon watching the Red Sox (who kept us up late as they beat the Royals in the 10th).

On SUNDAY NIGHT we spent a few enjoyable hours last night hanging out with Corto Maltese and his pal Rasputin. Not in person, mind you (which would be a little difficult), but in playing the Corto board game that was published a few years ago. We’re not board game geeks, so can’t speak to how it rates in the world of intense gamers, but we ARE long-time Corto fans and had a great time playing our parts in adventures taken directly from Pratt’s stories.

Now it’s Monday and back to work…!

IMG_0610

It’s Game Night!

Friday night is game night around the ol’ Library offices. All we have to do is decide which game to play. Three great choices — two vintage and one new. OPTION ONE is the 1937 Terry and the Pirates game:

The 1937 Terry board game!

IMG_0598IMG_0599IMG_0600

OPTION TWO is a 1933 Little Orphan Annie premium from Ovaltine.

IMG_0602IMG_0601

OPTION THREE is a modern game, complete with real strategy and plot threads taken from Hugo Pratt’s Corto Maltese graphic novels:

IMG_0603IMG_0604

Which one will we pick? Tune in on Monday!

Ain’t Nuthin’ like a year of Krazy

In Glen David Gold’s review in the Washington Post of Michael Tisserand’s impressive biography of George Herriman—Krazy: George Herriman, a Life in Black and White—Glen suggest that “readers yearning to see full strips would do well to find the recently released Library of American Comics Essentials collection of 1934 ‘Krazy Kat’ daily strips, as it shows a kind of quotidian context that the biography omits.”

A perfect complement!

KK331226

LOAC-KF-Essentials-1-KK

May the Force…

StaWars_cvr StarWars_page

It may not be May the Fourth yet, but we’ve received our advance copy of STAR WARS: The Classic Newsapaper Strips Volume One, featuring amazing artwork by Russ Manning, Rick Hoberg, Mike Royer, Dave Stevens, and Alfredo Alcala. (Plus a cover by Al Wiliamson!) Look for it in stores on May 10th!

The Case of the Duplicate Dunns…

 

IMG_0509Here we are — the 10th volume of LOAC Essentials, making a pretty impressive display on the ol’ bookcase.

As Bruce Canwell writes in the introduction: This volume represents something of a departure for the LOAC Essentials series, and for The Library of American Comics as a whole.

Dan Dunn, Secret Operative 48 debuted as a Monday-through-Saturday daily in September, 1933. By early 1934 a Sunday page had been added and Dunn’s creator, Norman Marsh, integrated the Sunday with the daily strips to form a continuous narrative that ran seven days a week.
Not every American, however, read both the daily and Sunday editions. Millions of readers never took the daily newspaper, but spent hours each week poring over the thick, feature-filled Sunday edition. Millions of others, by contrast, purchased only the weekday paper, its information and entertainment brightening their commute to or from work.
Like many of his peers Marsh advanced his stories only slightly in the Sundays, typically providing a recap in Monday’s strip to insure his readers were up-to-date on Dan’s crime-busting activities. In some weeks, however, the leap from Saturday to Monday was a little steeper than normal.
In containing only the dailies from the first year-plus of Dunn’s existence, this LOAC Essentials collection allows readers to share the experience of those countless households that did not take a Sunday paper.

IMG_0513

Star Hawks—as you’ve always wanted to see it!

Gil Kane! Ron Goulart! Star Hawks! We were really excited to open the package from the printer with this advance copy of Star Hawks Vol. 1. The strips are printed LARGE, one to a page, showing the full beauty of Gil Kane’s drawing, and includes a new intro by Ron Goulart. Look for it in stores late April.

StarHawks_cover StarHawks_pages

Super-Pete Poplaski!

Super_GA_Dailies

The new Superman Golden Age Dailies 1942-1944 will be in stores March 22nd!

One of the delights of editing and assembling the entire DC Newspaper Strip Library is working with Pete Poplaski, who provides all the covers. Pete could be called Mr. MxyzMimicMan because of his diligence in getting every detail right as he apes the style of Wayne Boring or Curt Swan, et al. It’s always a pleasure to receive Pete’s original art (yes, he’s one of the fewer and fewer artists who draws with pen and ink on paper, instead of directly to digital).

It’s also a heck of a lot of fun talking to him. Pete and I go way back — to the 1980 New York Comic Art Con, as he reminded me when we sat down in January at the 2017 Angoulême Festival in France. It was our mutual friend Mark Gruenwald who introduced us those thirty-seven years ago. Pete was pals with Mark back in Wisconsin; Mark and I had been roommates after he moved to New York. Some fans also know Pete as the world’s Number One Zorro Fan—he has been known on more than one occasion to dress up as Johnston McCulley’s famous character.

At any rate, here’s a tip of the hat to Pete Poplaski. He may have moved from Green Bay a couple of decades ago, but he continues to follow the Packers and was more than a little disappointed when they came up short in the NFC Championship game against the Falcons. Can’t win ’em all.

Pete Poplaski, Lorraine Turner, and Rika Deryckere at the 2017 Angoulême festival.Pete Poplaski, Lorraine Turner, and Rika Deryckere at dinner during the 2017 Angoulême festival.

Dean and Pete talking about the next Superman cover.Dean and Pete discuss the next Superman cover over lunch in Angoulême.

Ecco che arriva il Colonnello Canyon

As a partial payback to Italy for providing the world with arguably the best of all cuisines, we can report that Italian readers can now enjoy the best of the best in American comics: Milton Caniff is being translated by our friends at Editoriale Cosmo in Reggio Emilia. Francesco Meo and company have begun reprinting both Terry and the Pirates and Steve Canyon (as well as Russ Manning’s Tarzan). I met with Francesco at the Angoulême festival last week, where he was also considering reprinting the old Eclipse Airboy comics by Tim Truman, Chuck Dixon, and friends.

Dean and Francesco Meo at the Angoulême Festivalm January 2017.

Canyon1_Italian Canyon_Italian2

Sometimes Bigger IS Better

We received an advance copy of the Artist’s Edition of Alex Toth’s Bravo for Adventure, filled with lots of previously unpublished goodies. Those who placed advance orders should be receiving their copies next month!

BravoAE1

BravoAE3

 

BravoAE2

BravoAE4

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes