Author Archive | Dean Mullaney

It’s a LOAC Invasion!

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The Library of American Comics is headin’ for New York Comic Con, October 8-10 at the Javits Center. Come to IDW’s Booth 2115 and meet Creative Director Dean Mullaney, Associate Editor (and author of the forthcoming Alex Toth biography!) Bruce Canwell, plus assorted friends and sundry acquaintances. We look forward to talking to you about our favorite classic comic strips, and to show off our new releases. Get the exclusive first looks at Blondie and Polly and Her Pals.

See you there!

 

Check…and re-check

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Although all restoration and design for our books are done digitally using Macs and Cintiq interactive pen displays, we still receive hard-copy proofs for every book from the printer. Mornings seem to be when the ol’ eyeballs work best, so with coffee and pen in hand, we check the proofs and make corrections the old-fashioned way. There’s nothing like seeing the pages on paper in order to make those final corrections. Here are the proofs for Li’l Abner volume 2, which is being approved for print today. It will be on sale in stores in November.

Secret Agent Corrigan Hits Stores!

Corrigan_titleThe first volume of our multi-volume series reprising Al Williamson and Archie Goodwin’s X-9: Secret Agent Corrigan has officially hit the bookstores. The strips are reproduced from Al Williamson’s personal proofs. To provide context, Mark Schultz wrote a touching tribute to Al, and Bruce Canwell offers up a detailed look at the history of X-9, going back to its creation in 1934 by Dashiell Hammett and Alex Raymond.

Beau Smith joins the Library

Beau Smith, self-styled raconteur and manly man about town, has joined the Library of American Comics as our new Director of Marketing.

We’re thrilled to have Beau onboard. He and I go way back to the 1980s and Eclipse Comics, where I was the publisher and Beau the Marketing Director.

A graduate of Marshall University in his native West Virginia, Beau’s done it all in comics. In addition to Eclipse, where he got his start, Beau was the VP of Marketing and Publishing for Image Comics, Todd McFarlane Productions and McFarlane Toys, was with IDW Publishing for many years, and is the former Director of Product Information for toy maker JUN Planning USA.

As a comics writer, Beau’s written Batman, Superman, and Wolverine, and his stories have appeared at DC, Image, IDW, Eclipse, Dreamwave, Moonstone, Dark Horse, and many other publishers. He created several well-received series, including Wynonna Earp, Parts Unknown,Maximum Jack, Courting Fate, and Cobb.

If that wasn’t enough, he offers his pearls of wisdom in regular columns: “Busted Knuckles” at Comics Bulletin, and “From the Ranch” for Sketch Magazine.

Beau’s going to be focussing on retailers, libraries, and universities, so all retailers, librarians, professors, and teachers are encouraged to give him a shout: beau@loacomics.com.

 

 

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Of Kings, Newsboys, and Pinheads…

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Bill Griffith always keep us laughing, and this “Zippy” daily from Friday, September 10th, is no exception. What makes this daily different from all others? Check out his hilarious reference to Jack Kent’s King Aroo in the first panel. “Big words” is another reason for you to give theMyopian King a try, if you haven’t already.

Thanks to Bill for letting us post the daily (©2010 Bill Griffith). His — and Zippy’s — own siteshould be on your list of regularly-viewed sites.

Happy Birthday, BLONDIE!

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Today is Blondie‘s 80th Anniversary! Here’s the very first daily. Chic Young’s classic creation premiered on September 8, 1930 in only two newspapers, and grew to become to world’s most popular strip. Congrats to the entire Young family, as well as King Features! And don’t miss our first volume of Blondie dailies — from the beginning — which will be on sale soon!

Dateline: Myopia

We were mighty pleased to discover that King Aroo Volume 1 got a positive review from noted fantasist and critic Charles de Lint. Mr. de Lint writes a regular review column in the mightyMagazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, and he closes the May/June 2010 installment of his “Books to Look For” by telling his readers that Jack Kent’s King Aroo is “just so darn good.” And who are we to disagree?

You can read the review at: http://www.sfsite.com/fsf/2010/cdl1005.htm. If you’re looking for some prose reading, the full column contains looks at recent releases by Stephen King, Nina Kiriki Hoffman, Cory Doctorow, and Peter Straub. Or if you’re the impatient type, scroll to the bottom of the page to read Mr. de Lint’s delightful words about Aroo.

In Sergio Aragones’s introduction to the first Aroo book, he wrote about his love for the strip. Here’s Sergio and me catching up for a chat at the San Diego Comicon this year. (He’s the handsome one on the right)Dean_Sergio

We’re currently putting together the finishing touches on King Aroo volume 2, which collects November 1952 through November 1954. Jack Kent Jr. has again provided all the original art in his family’s collection, and Bubbly Bruce Canwell has written another incredible biographical essay. Here’s one of my all-time favorite Aroo dailies (from December 25, 1952) that fully captures Kent’s amazing talent for wordplay.

 

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Noel Sickles 1935!

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It’s not often that we get to see previously unknown art from seventy-five years ago by one of the greatest cartoonists of all time. The above specialty drawing by Noel Sickles came to us from Everett Slaughter, via our pal Leif Peng. It is only the second color Scorchy Smith piece by Sickles that I’ve ever seen (the other we reproduced in Scorchy Smith and The Art of Noel Sickles). Everett writes, “My late wife, Virginia, was a neighbor to Noel Sickles in Chillicothe, Ohio.  Attached is a cartoon Noel did for her in July, 1935 when she was 10 years of age.”

Sickles had an obvious fondness for his young neighbor. The cartoonist was living in New York in 1935, sharing studio space with Milton Caniff, but made regular trips back to Chillicothe to visit with his family. The watercolor is of Scorchy and his pal, the German pilot Himmelstoss, and references a Western storyline from the strip.

Thanks so much to Everett for sharing this treasure with us.

The Eisner and Harvey Award-nominated Scorchy Smith and the Art of Noel Sickles is available at your favorite comics shop, online bookseller, or IDW’s webstore.

And in case you aren’t familiar with Leif Peng’s fantastic blog about 20th Century illustrators, take a look. It’s on my “must-read” list every week.

Bloom County Wins 2010 Eisner Award

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The Library of American Comics again won the Eisner Award for Best Archival Project—Newspaper Strips given at the San Diego Comicon, as Bloom County took home the honors. LOAC’s Bringing Up Father was also nominated.

Above are (left to right) Creative Director Dean Mullaney, Associate Art Director (and Sunday colorist) Lorraine Turner, Berkeley Breathed himself, and series editor Scott Dunbier (proudly holding the award).

It was the first Comicon appearance for Berkeley, who also received the Inkpot Award. He was a real trooper, signing books and talking with fans for three straight days. He also created a Comicon-exclusive t-shirt. Needless to say, a fun time was had by all.

 

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