Author Archive | Lorraine Turner

The Eisner Award nominess are…

We’re pleased as punch to have received three Eisner Award nominations this year.

Of the five books nominated in the Best Comics-Related Book category, two are LOAC productions:

1. What Fools These Mortals Be, the lavish Puck collection by Michael Kahn and Richard West.

2. Dean and Bruce’s Genius, Animated: The Cartoon Art of Alex Toth (the third book in their Alex Toth trilogy. Fans will recall that Genius, Illustrated was the big winner in 2014).

Our sister imprint—EuroComics—garnered a nomination for its very first release! Corto Maltese: Under the Sign of Capricorn by Hugo Pratt is nominated in the Best U.S. Edition of Foreign Material category!

Our thanks to the Eisner Award judges for their acknowledgments!

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Divorce and Round-Ups

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I never thought meditation would have me talking to horses, let alone writing on their behalf. Nonetheless I am excited to announce the release of my very first novel—Calico Horses and the Patchwork Trail. It’s the story of how a girl ripped apart by divorce helps the wild mustangs torn from the range. Together they face uncertainties brought on by the decisions of others.

It’s available now as an e-book, and as a print release the end of March. Recommended for readers age 8 and up, it’s not just a young adult book. Adults who have struggled with adversity are making the connection to the book’s themes. I invite you to watch the video (less than two minutes)…

This book was written with the sole purpose of raising awareness to the plight of the wild horses and burros being ripped from their natural habitat. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to support the rescued horses that are now in equine sanctuaries. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

And you thought I was only the Art Director for LOAC…

 

Alex Raymond’s Guided Tour

I am in the process of restoring Sunday strips for Flash Gordon Volume Two. Alex Raymond’s art is such a treasure—it’s like I am working on pieces that belong in a museum. That’s how I feel about these books…they are all little museums and I get to help guide the reader through the rooms. The Jungle Jim renderings have definitely taken a new turn. In Volume One all the plain-faced babes were in jodhpur pants and pith helmets—now we see them in low-cut dresses and bare legs, topped off with lipstick and eye shadow. I can’t help but grin at the obvious sexy styles of the heroine and villainesses.

In Flash Gordon the faraway overview scenes familiar in Volume One now switch to tight close-ups, revealing Raymond’s exquisite detailing of facial anatomy. He captures the characters’ expressions in tight renderings and excellent line work. This new focus draws us into the drama, showing how the characters are “feeling” during the adventure. As a woman I am sensitive to the storyline of the 1930s in which the females seem unable to fend for themselves and have nothing in their wardrobe except high heels and skimpy outfits that reveal lots of cleavage. But it is Raymond’s brilliant ability to create a futuristic world of laser guns and rockets that continues to enthrall me. His art has clearly inspired others. I love coming across panels like this. Who knew Stormtrooper uniforms were all the rage in the mid-30s?

 

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It is with gratitude that I write this little blog. I wake every day and have the pleasure of visiting art museums inside the world of LOAC. On any given day, I find myself in the galleries of some of the best artists who have ever walked this planet such as Alex Toth, Cliff Sterrett, Percy Crosby, George McManus, and Alex Raymond. I often wonder if the fans of comics today have ever even heard of these wonderful artists. If they haven’t then tell them—spread the word and maybe those costumes you see at the next Comic-Con will reflect a different attitude. Perhaps instead of Chewbacca, Wonder Woman, and Spiderman you’ll find Polly, Dagwood, or even an original Stormtrooper—now that would be something to see!

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Unexpected Treasure

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Recently I had the privilege of doing research at the wonderful Cartoon Art Library at The Ohio State University. I have always loved history; it was my best subject in school…after recess and gym. I am a graphic artist and designer, but my hobby is genealogy, and I’ve become a pretty good researcher.

I say pretty good, because I am not and never will be a sleuth like some of my ancestry.com geeks (sorry, I mean “friends”) who are far ahead of me in this field. But I have to tell you, the thought of leaving 88-degree temperatures and my home facing teal water for the double-sweatered university research room with sterile white tables and SILENCE…well, let’s just say I had some mental adjusting to do. But I was anxious to begin the journey, and Dean had sweetened the deal with a promised Michigan family Thanksgiving. So naturally I was all ears.

I am a novice at comic history and here I was accompanying Dean, the bloodhound, on his mission. He instinctively knows what he’s looking for and where to look. I was just following his lead and pulling out any tidbit I thought we could use in one of our upcoming archival books. I swear, he’s like a hawk…nothing escapes his perception. Is he even human? I digress…

 

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Prior to our trip, we had made contact with a wonderful young man named Matt Tauber, who lived in the area and offered his help. Matt has a wonderful blog on Milton Caniff. He arrived early and was waiting as we walked into the library. Thank goodness…someone who actually goes by non-Key West time (in Key West, an hour late is the same as being on time). Dean and I liked him immediately.

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He wore a million-dollar smile, emitted non-stop energy and a positive attitude that made the day sing. That’s the best way  to describe it…like great harmony. The memory of this day was like listening to a great melody. As I was shuffling through the files, wearing my Ohio State University-issued white cotton gloves, I became aware of a dynamic in the room that became a sort of revelation.

Dean kept stopping, turning, and showing Matt precious gems—obscure articles, original art, letters, memos, pencil sketches, and the mementos of family and friends of the many artists and writers who comprised a historic comics generation that has since passed. Matt would become totally enthralled and the two of them would exchange silent looks of pure joy and understanding.

That’s when it hit me. This was it—this was the reason for the endless hours, the long brainstorming sessions, the meetings, the interviews, the letter writing…all of it. For this…that pure joy. I thought we had embarked on this expedition to uncover facts and art that were useful in telling a story. This was and IS the story. By collecting all this art and information and placing it in a book, we can give others that smile when they see it for the first time and own it for themselves.

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As we continue to uncover more of these little jewels, we can pass them along, too. And it will be there for this generation and for all generations. Joy…pure joy. And here I was fretting over the weather, silly me. I was part of an expedition. Some go to the Arctics…I went to Paradise.

 

Eat more strawberries

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Once upon a time, about twenty-six years ago, I had a little girl who was fascinated with Annie. She saw the movie with Carol Burnett and, at the age of three, memorized every dang song from it. We still refer to this as her “Annie Phase.” My father bought every scruffy stuffed Sandy and Annie doll he could get his hands on at local flea markets and yard sales. He even told her if she ate enough strawberries, her hair would turn red.

And so it is with great joy and fondness that I now find myself restoring this fantastic work of Harold Gray. This spunky little girl reminds me of my own tough scrappy kid, the one who is now all grown up, the one who has organized and composed all of the music for her own band named after her childhood hero…”Orphan.” Perhaps destiny led me to this remastering work, perhaps fate…or perhaps a calling to be near someone I love and admire.

Comics reflecting moments captured in time…a kid teaching an adult. The story continues :)

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If My Dad Could See Me Now

f you can imagine yourself slipping into the ink pot and flowing out the end of a cartoonist’s pen, this is how I felt when I worked restoring the raw talent in Cliff Sterrett’s Polly and Her PalsSunday pages.  We just approved the color proofs and the book, all 12″ x 16″ of it, is now in the printer’s hands.

My profession of graphic design has taught me more about people than the artwork itself; I’ve worked on tight deadlines and sometimes felt like I was running up the courts along with the NBA players I helped market. You get to know the subject well and you either love it or survive the stress.

Polly and her Pals put me in touch with this amazing creator, Samuel Clifford Sterrett. I closely studied each swoosh and brush stroke as his linework danced and dipped. His characters felt like members of my own family. I stumbled along every unfolding gag with Sterrett’s bizarre unpredictable checkered pathways leading me to Paw with twinkling eyes, and the purring Kitty. Kitty—heart of a lion and the strength of a Dane. Her attitude came alive as she added her two cents in every upturned-nosed-strut. I love Sterrett’s extra little touches—the curl at the end of Paw’s beard and the crink of Kitty’s tail as it mocked the direction of the staircase. His use of patterns and inexplicable objects that appear like unexpected hail kept my interest peaked and the laughter flowing. This was not a job-this was playing with one of the kids that created sheer FUN for my parents’ generation. How awesome to be able to bring this to future generations. Sterrett was an artist some thought daffy, but in reality, of course, he was a visionary pioneer.

I am thrilled to have been a part of presenting this work. I feel as if I have met Sterrett, wish I had…perhaps in my next lifetime. Gazing through Paw’s iron-sashed windows with smiling crescent moons, I will happily dream on.

 

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