Archive | Dick Tracy

A Coming Attraction of a Different Sort

The holiday hustle and bustle is affecting a lot of us (and a lot of you, too, I bet!), but though 2018 still has nineteen days left as I pen these words, it’s not too early to be looking forward to 2019. The year ahead will offer the next chapters in such long-running series as For Better of For Worse, Little Orphan Annie, Dick Tracy, and Superman (among others), plus some surprising new releases. It will all be building up to an extra-special milestone that, in this day of social media and minimalist message content, might be designated “D4200.”

More on exactly what that means coming in January, when we inaugurate a new monthly feature in this space: The LOAC Wheel of Fortune!

Sure, it may not look like much now, but when we load it with content and give it a whirl next month and in the months thereafter, we think you’ll enjoy the results. What we can tell you right now is that this LOAC Wheel of Fortune has nothing to do with the TV Wheel of Fortune, on which my wife was a contestant earlier this year (discussed as the lead item in this May posting).

For now, however, here’s wishing all visitors to this space a happy last few weeks of 2018!

Barry One, Pearl Two

A few months ago in this space I showed you some photos of our LOAC books, arrayed on my bookshelves — you can see it here, if you’d like a refresher.

More recently, we received some impressive bookshelf photos from another comics historian, the estimable Barry Pearl. Check out this first of five shots of Mr. Pearl’s amassed comics collections and be prepared, like me, to resist the urge to whistle in appreciation …

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Episode 008 with special guest Jeff Kersten

Dean Mullaney is on vacation so LOAC Associate Editor Bruce Canwell joins Kurtis Findlay for another episode of the Library of American Comics & EuroComics Podcast!

In this episode, Bruce and Kurtis talk about Jerome K. Jerome Bloche, Vol. 2: The Paper People as well as upcoming projects like Amazing Spider-Man, Vol. 5 and Steve Canyon, Vol. 9. Plus, Dick Tracy enthusiast and historian Jeff Kersten discusses the political subtext found between the panels of Dick Tracy and what we can expect in vol. 23 and 24!

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Buongiorno from Bologna!

Here’s LOAC Art Director Lorraine Turner with Francesco Meo of the Italian comics publisher Cosmo Editoriale. We had lunch with Francesco today in Bologna, renewing the friendship we established at Angoulême last year. Newspaper strips fans will be glad to know that Francesco is publishing Italian editions of Terry and the Pirates, Steve Canyon, Dick Tracy, Russ Manning’s Tarzan, Flash Gordon, Rip Kirby, as well as other “A” list strips!

Back to the Shelves

Several years ago we took some time in this space to show you what my LOAC bookshelf looked like. I shelve my books in alphabetical order by author, or by publisher where that makes more sense — for instance, while my William Saroyans are under “S”, my Fantastic Fours are under “M”, with the rest of my Marvel Comics collections. My Library of American Comics titles are therefore under “L,” and then shelved alphabetically in a logical way (well, logical to me, anyway), as you can see:

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2017: The LOAC Year in Review

The Library of American Comics marked its tenth year of publication this summer, and using this milestone as a launching point, 2017 was the year LOAC took the comics world by storm. The familiar “word balloon” logo was emblazoned on a wide range of products including t-shirts, coffee mugs, towels, baseball caps, and even lace doilies to drape over the back of sofas or love-seats. There were the LOAC events at major conventions on both coasts. The article on us (with the biographical sidebar about Dean) in that July issue of Entertainment Weekly. And how about …

Wait. None of that really occurred. Sorry — sorry!

Instead, what happened during 2017 was that LOAC continued its mission to collect a wide range of entertaining and significant newspaper comics in permanent hardcover editions, helping to preserve the “strips” portion of comics, one of the handful of truly native American artforms.

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