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The Greatest New Year’s Eve Sunday of All!

It doesn’t get any better than this spectacular Sunday by George McManus and Zeke Zekley from December 31, 1939. Ahhh, back at a time when artists spent days—sometimes weeks—on a single Sunday comic strip, with no thought of posterity or future book collections such as those we are now producing. Masterworks such as this were created to read but once in an ephemeral newspaper on a relaxing Sunday morning. Incredible but true.

Happy New York to one and all!

 

 

d_4172, Tue Jan 20, 2009,  1:39:44 PM,  8C, 7604x7150,  (1591+6581), 150%, Ireland_repro2,  1/60 s, R72.5, G61.7, B71.1

As Rouge Would say:

Though comics are one of the bare handful of born-in-America artforms, their appeal crosses all political and geographical borders. Submitted as proof of this hypothesis—as if proof be needed!…one of the first European editions of a Library of American Comics book. In October, 2010, Nicholas Forsans, Jean-Baptiste Barbier, Antonie Mathon, and their fine co-workers at Bdartist(e) released a lovely translated-into-the-French version of Milton Caniff’s Terry and the Pirates, Volume 1. Here’s a look at their familiar-yet-different front dustjacket for the book:

French_Terry-1

More than two decades after Caniff’s passing and with almost sixty-five years gone by since he abandoned post-War China in favor of Horizons, Unlimited, Bdartist(e)’s release stands as testament to Milt’s unmatched talent and the timeless appeal of Terry Lee and his vivid, unforgettable supporting cast.

Their book follows our own Terry Volume 1 closely, but not exactly. Howard Chaykin’s introduction and my essay were retained; Dean’s preface was not. Like us, Bdartist(e) chose to provide a ribbon bookmark, but Randy Scott’s Index to Volume 1 has been replaced by eight pages of “Hommages:” interpretations of Terry in both color and black-&-white by Continental artists that served as a preview of a December 2010 exhibition on display at the publisher’s gallery, located at 55 rue Condorcet in Paris.

Aside from the text on the front endpapers, the daily reprinted on the back flap of the dustjacket, and the “Character Key to Our Cover” feature, the entire book has been translated into French, all the strips re-lettered. This means our European friends are deprived of Frank Engli’s beautiful lettering, but the work of Maximilien Chailleux is crisp and clean, and certainly it must be no easy task to place translated text within space defined for the “mother tongue.” Well done, M’sieur Chailleux!

As I browsed Terry et les Pirates, I speculated on the considerable challenge one faces in translating Caniff’s dialogue into another language. As the series unfolds, many of Milton’s characters use an increasingly snappy and sometime esoteric American slang, and several of his secondary players routinely fracture the King’s English as a reminder of their Asian or European origins (think of Singh-Singh’s love of “Pappermeents,” or Rouge, using one of her many aliases while confirming what Flippo Corkin has just wryly observed: “Preencess Rojo does have the prett-ee feegure!”). Is it possible to capture even the majority of the insouciance and humor contained in Milton’s scripting? Michel Pagel, who adapted the text in tome 1, will surely handle that considerable task with professionalism, skill, and care.

Alas, I’ll be a poor judge of his efforts—four years of school-years German left me ill-equipped to tackle a French translation!

Terry_french_text

 

Believe it or not, this is not the first time my work has been translated for European audiences. I own copies of both the French and German editions of Lee Weeks’s and my graphic novel,Batman: The Gauntlet. (There’s reportedly also a Spanish edition I’ve been unable to find – so if anyone knows where I can get a copy of Robin: Dia Un, I’d be greatly indebted … )LE_DEFI

Cover to the French edition of Gauntlet, which also featured a James Robinson/Lee Weeks
short story reprinted from Legends of the
Dark Knight #100)

 

On this side of the Atlantic, each week we’re bombarded with e-mails from readers requesting second printings of the LOAC Terry and the Pirates, since many volumes of the initial run are sold out, with copies commanding high prices on the secondary market ($200-300 for Volume Five!). While we have not yet completed our plans—there are scheduling, printing, and economic factors that have to be weighed and balanced—we will be offering second printings of Terry as we look to keep Milton Caniff’s original masterpiece in print during the second decade of the 21st Century. Watch this space for notification when the presses start rolling.

Meanwhile (with a lot of help from Google-Translate): Un grand merci à Bdartist(e) de me donner une copie de leur merveilleuse Terry et les pirates, tome 1! Mes félicitations pour produire un beau livre!

You’ll find the Amazon-France listing for Bdartist(e)’s Terry tome 1 here …

… While the page on Bdartist(e)’s website devoted to Terry – complete with French press coverage – is located here.

Master of the Motherload in Michigan

randy

I’ve known Randy Scott and been familiar with Michigan State University’s Comic Art Collection since the late 1970s. I recently found a carbon copy (remember those?) of the letter I sent him in 1978 that accompanied a copy of Sabre by Don McGregor and Paul Gulacy, the inaugural book from my publishing company, Eclipse Comics. Sabre was the first graphic novel ever published for the comics specialty market, and at a time when graphic novels and comics were considered trash by most universities, I thought it pretty impressive that at least one Big Time College Library would collect what I published!

sabre

MSU then became the home for the complete files of Eclipse Comics, from beginning to end. It’s turned out to be a useful resource. For example, when Blake Bell was writing his excellent bookon Steve Ditko, I was able to offer him nearly 100 pages of original research we did at Eclipse in the 1980s, including notes from an interview with Ditko’s brother.

Randy and I were also early members of APA-I. What’s that, you ask? Basically, a bunch of comics nuts producing indexes to different series, writers, and artists. Three other early APA-I members went on to form the Grand Comics Database.

New_arrivals

randy_dean

So here we are, thirty years later — Randy is STILL the comics maven at Michigan State University, while I’m preserving and restoring classic comics as founder of The Library of American Comics. Many of our releases boast indexes by…you guessed it, Randy Scott.

randy_lorraine

Randy shows Lorraine Turner and me some of the hard-to-find European comics he’s brought home from a recent buying trip..

stacksStacks of fun!

bandroomRandy and fellow librarians on campus use his office for their weekly jazz improvs.

old_comics

Some uncatalogued tearsheets from the King Features collection.

On our recent research trip to East Lansing, the home of MSU’s Special Collections Library, Lorraine Turner and I barely scratched the surface of the several hundred thousand (yes, several hundred thousand!) comics, graphic novels, and books about comics in the stacks. We were concentrating our research on—among other subjects—Alex Raymond’s syndicate proofs forFlash Gordon and Jungle Jim; the cartoonists Otto Soglow, creator of The Little King; Frank Robbins, creator of Johnny Hazard; and Jimmy Hatlo, of They’ll Do It Every Time and Little Iodinefame…

…and to look through my old Eclipse files relating to Alex Toth. Our forthcoming book—Genius, Isolated: The Life and Art of Alex Toth—will be richer because the Eclipse files containing correspondence and stats of original artwork have been preserved and catalogued at Michigan State University.

Gift_of_Murder_Notes

Here’s Alex’s note to me expressing uncertainly over who drew this page originally published by Standard Comics. In the 1980s at Eclipse, I reprinted six issues worth of Standard stories in a series entitled Seduction of the Innocent. Alex’s comment that “you won’t have to pay any of us old crocks” refers to my policy of paying reprint rates to artists or their heirs, regardless of the fact that the comics were in the public domain. It’s a policy I maintain today: Alex’s family is sharing in royalties on our Genius books. It’s a policy we encourage other publishers to adopt.

* * * * *

So here’s a “Hear, Hear” for my old pal Randy Scott, Comic Art Bibliographer, Indexing Guru, and (with his wife Lynn) the best host north of Columbus, Ohio, and south of Cadillac, Michigan.

Hunting(ton) Season

Beau_rocker

 

The fact that hunting season opened in the Middle West had nothing to do with why we were in Huntington, West Virginia last week. What could have drawn us nearly 1,200 miles away from the delightlfuly warm temperatures of Key West? Nothing less than a Library of American Comics confab with our marketing and sales guru, Beau Smith. Those who know Beau are aware of the fact that he rarely leaves his home town (the electronic shackles on his ankles may have something to do with it—only kidding!). Oh, he’ll travel up to Mid-Ohio Con each year, but that’s about as far afield as he likes to go.

Luckily for us, Huntington was a convenient first stop on our trip. Beau’s been doing a great job expanding our sales to libraries and universities. Here, he and Associate Art Director (and marketing whiz herself) Lorraine Turner exchange ideas about spreading the word in the halls of academia.

pointing-1

For as many books as Beau and I have worked together on in the past twenty-five years, we still get a thrill opening that first box from the printer to see the latest release.

Beau_book

Beau also gave us a fun tour of the town, which included the stadium of the Marshall football team (his alma mater, and the subject of the movie, “We Are Marshall”). Before we hit the road, Beau’s better half, Beth, joined us for a cracklin’ good breakfast. And then we were off to our next stop: Columbus, Ohio. More about that in our next entry.

 

Beau_Beth

Overlapping strips

DT480710

 

In working on the layout for The Complete Dick Tracy volume 11, I searched for a specific daily—July 10, 1948—to place in the page design. The search results came up with the requested Tracydaily, but also a Rip Kirby daily and an Archie daily from the same date.

I guess it should have dawned on me earlier because with more than thirty books published as part of the Library of American Comics, we’re starting to see overlapping dates from strip to strip. We tend to look at each series as a distinct collection, but great cartoonists such as Chester Gould, Bob Montana, and Alex Raymond didn’t work in a vacuum—their strips often appeared alongside one other’s.

Archie480710

 

So in the interest of imaging what it would have been like to read a daily comics page at the time, here are three dailies from July 10, 1948.

 

RK480710

And for more fun, imagine the thrill of reading Milton Caniff’s Terry and the Pirates, Al Capp’s Li’l Abner, and Harold Gray’s Little Orphan Annie all on the same day?! Here are those strips from May 21, 1937.

Enjoy!

Terry370521

Abner370521

LOA370521

Overlapping strips

DT480710-1

In working on the layout for The Complete Dick Tracy volume 11, I searched for a specific daily—July 10, 1948—to place in the page design. The search results came up with the requested Tracydaily, but also a Rip Kirby daily and an Archie daily from the same date.

I guess it should have dawned on me earlier because with more than thirty books published as part of the Library of American Comics, we’re starting to see overlapping dates from strip to strip. We tend to look at each series as a distinct collection, but great cartoonists such as Chester Gould, Bob Montana, and Alex Raymond didn’t work in a vacuum—their strips often appeared alongside one other’s.

Archie480710-1

So in the interest of imaging what it would have been like to read a daily comics page at the time, here are three dailies from July 10, 1948.

RK480710-1

And for more fun, imagine the thrill of reading Milton Caniff’s Terry and the Pirates, Al Capp’s Li’l Abner, and Harold Gray’s Little Orphan Annie all on the same day?! Here are those strips from May 21, 1937. Enjoy!

Terry370521-1

Abner370521-1

LOA370521-1

 

 

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