On the Town with George and Zeke

It was a great honor to have our Bringing Up Father: From Sea to Shining Sea nominated for a 2010 Eisner Award. There can be only one winner in each category, and BUF did not take home the trophy (Bloom County, our other entry in the awards, did win—yay!) but we gained a lot of satisfaction from the Eisner committee’s recognition of the fabulous work of George McManus and his long-time assistant, Zeke Zekley.

As usual, our research into the history of the strip and its creators blended details from well-known sources with newly-uncovered information and rare photographs. In studying the life of George McManus for BUF: FStSS, I bought all three issues of the early 1950s Collier‘s Magazine that featured the artist’s autobiographical musings. My research also uncovered birth records from the City of St. Louis that provided, for the first time, clear-cut proof of the date McManus came into this world (Geo. McM. himself often played fast and loose with that information). I was also fascinated to find McManus remained in the news after his passing – wire services and several newspapers followed the story Zeke Zekley going to court to contest McManus’s will. This was fresh information to even some of the art form’s most erudite scholars.

From Sea to Shining Sea also brought what is, to my knowledge, unprecedented (but much deserved) attention to the accomplishments of Zeke Zekley. It was the cooperation of comics historian and Zekley acquaintance Chris Jenson, as well as interviews with Zekley’s descendants, that made possible this coverage.

Now, presented for your viewing pleasure, here are a half-dozen additional photographs of George and Zeke. They came to us courtesy of David Folkman, of Hogan’s Alley fame, who was very close to Zeke for many years.

First up, McManus and the Zekleys chow down Hollywood-style, accompanied by actress Renie Riano, who played Maggie in five Bringing Up Father motion pictures:

 

GN_Z_Anita_Riano

If this next photo is any indication, McManus gravitated toward the lovely ladies as much as did his strip’s hero, Jiggs. Though surrounded by fellow cartoonists, notice George is chatting with Zeke’s wife, Anita Zekley.

 

Group

Cartoonists have a long and notable history of doing their bit for Uncle Sam. Here’s Zeke (third from left) standing next to Dennis the Menace’s Hank Ketcham at a U.S. Savings Bond event that included cartoonists Chic (Blondie) Young, Gus Edson (Dondi), Milt Gross, Ferd Johnson, Dan (Hopalong Cassidy) Spiegle, and several others.

Savings_Bond_Drive

McManus moved in the same circles with artist Jimmy Swinnerton, another favorite of William Randolph Hearst (the newspaper mogul who was the prime mover and shaker behind King Features Syndicate). Here, George and Swinny share a laugh:

GM_Swinnerton

And here they participate in a U.S. Treasury event. Two things to call to your attention: [1] at far-right is George’s brother, Leo McManus, who worked for many years at King Features. [2] Notice with whom George is shaking hands – none other than Walt Disney, himself!

 

Group2Finally – my lifelong love of Popeye is well known amongst my social circle, but have you ever seen a sorrier version of that spinach-eating gazookas than the one in this 1949 photo?Z_Soglow_M_Laswel_49_ArmHos

Zeke and Otto (The Little King) Soglow appear to be massaging Popeye’s flaccid right arm muscles while McManus gives the squinky-eyed sailor a pep talk. Fred Lasswell (Barney Google and Snuffy Smith) may be wondering if even a can of spinach would be enough to help this guy whip Bluto.

You may also want to take a look at Popeye’s pants. Could it be that E.C. Segar’s inspired creation invented the “low-riders” so prominently worn around today’s schools and malls?

One of the absolute truisms of studying comics history: no matter how much we uncover, there is always more to be learned!

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes