Sir MixaLot

Many of us remember when the idea of alternate universes was strictly the province of science fiction and comics enthusiasts. SF writers like Robert Silverberg, using their personal interest in history, have dabbled with the concept in short stories and novels for decades (most recently inRoma Eterna). “Mirror, Mirror,” one of Star Trek‘s most popular episodes, dropped Captain Kirk and three of his officers into an “evil twin” reality. And DC Comics has maintained a decades-long love affair with alternates, beginning with the Gardiner Fox/Carmine Infantino “Flash of Two Worlds” story from 1961’s Flash # 123.

Today we live in a science fictional world, and the phrase “alternate universe” is part of the common cultural coin, to the point where even crusty Republicans like Newt Gingrich are making money off the idea.

Recently I found myself pondering possible alternate universe comic strips. If there truly are an infinite number of Earths in the multiverse, these four comics must exist out there somewhere:

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Little Orphan Terry: Taken in as a seven-year-old by Oliver “Daddy” Warbucks, Terry Lee grows up finding adventure in the four corners of the globe. Terry proves he’ll not be separated from his adoptive guardian when he stows away the first time “Daddy” sails to deal with business interests in the Far East: even today, the “Wun Wey Battles Captain Blaze” storyline remains a classic. Many are especially fond of later stories, after Terry has grown into young manhood and helps “Daddy” get girls.

Scorch Kirby: Alex Raymond’s ex-aviator private eye has a straight nose and never wears glasses or plays the piano; Honey Dorian finds him crude but irresistible, especially after he feeds Pagan Lee to the law for her involvement with The Mangler. Scorch’s butlers never seem to last long. Short-timers like Tex and Gus have their supporters, though the majority of fans divide equally between the droll reserve of Desmond and the thick German accent of Himmelstoss.

Bringing Up Family: The George McManus/Zeke Zekley “diagrammatic” Sundays remain must-see material, as Maggie and her brood criss-cross the city in search of Jiggs and his carousing buddies.

Li’l Annie: The red-headed waif is the smartest (and best spoken) person in Dogpatch; her bemused comments about the zany antics going on around her built a daily readership that numbered in the tens of millions. She was beloved for her annual consultations with Old Man Mose in order to help deserving bachelorettes land a “dream-boat” on Sadie Hawkins Day. After Annie and the Dogpatch kids brought Gat Garson to justice, a pop culture catch phrase was born in 1939 with Garson’s last words on his way to the electric chair: ” … And I’d have gotten away with it, too – if it hadn’t been for those KIDS!”

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Got an alternate universe comic strip you’d like to see in this space? Send your ideas toinfo@loacomics.com ; we’ll run a follow-up in a future installment!

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