Tag Archives | Gil Kane

Quick (But Sincere) Notes of Thanks

Events of recent days leave me with a handful of folks to whom I owe thanks, and I might as well do it publicly (though I think I’ve already done it privately, as well — better too much thanks than not enough!) …

… I’ve previously written in this space about a group I’ve been lucky enough to count as friends for more than thirty-five years (click here). One of those friends, who has been a premier comic book artist for just about thirty of those thirty-five years, is Lee Weeks. On Thursday, August 10th Lee pointed our little band (including yr hmbl svnt) to an absolutely wonderful Vanity Fair piece: When Fairfield County Was the Comic-Strip Capital of the World. The writer, Cullen Murphy, has done us a true service in this outstanding work, which captures a place, time, and assemblage of talent and personalities that should be near and dear to our hearts. I don’t throw around phrases like “a must-read” very often, but in this case I believe it’s not hyperbole to label “When Fairfield County …” a must-read for LOACers everywhere. And after you’ve checked out what Mr. Murphy has to tell us, I think you’ll join me in thanking Lee for directing us to it.

#

… I’ve done a clutch of interviews this month, and so let me thank Howard Chaykin for taking time from his busy schedule to speak with me about his contributions to Star Hawks, and his mentor, the strip’s visual architect, Gil Kane. In our upcoming Star Hawks Volume 2 you’ll see more Kane, as well as sequences illustrated by both artist Ernie Colon and Chaykin himself, as this sample from January, 1979 shows. That action sequence in panels two and three is pure Chaykin:

STAR HAWKS 19790106

Additionally, through circumstances that had a long gestation period and an unlikely chain of events, I’ve interviewed Lani Kida (granddaughter of Amazing Spider-Man newspaper strip artist Fred Kida) and her father, Paul. Both these wonderful persons were generous with stories and memories of their talented relative, and while I’m still putting together all the pieces, I’m confident that in the near future you’ll be learning more about Fred Kida than you’ve found at any other source (and seeing rare artwork the family has shared, too!). Be watching for the fifth volume of our Amazing Spider-Man series, and keep watching this space, as well. Meanwhile, here’s a second look at a 1982 Kida Sunday featuring the wondrous wall-crawler and the malevolent monarch of Latveria, Doctor Doom —

ASM_19820228

#

… Thanks are hereby extended to the handful of faithful visitors to this space who wrote to tell me they’ve bought copies of John Sayles’s mammoth novel, A Moment in the Sun. (Here’s my original review.) My fingers are crossed you enjoy this sprawling epic as much as I did!

#

… Finally, a thanks we never lose sight of and one we can never offer enough: a big T*H*A*N*K   Y*O*U to everyone who supports our efforts and buys our books. With all the options available to you and all the competition for your hard-earned entertainment dollar, it is humbling to know you choose to invest time and money in LOAC. We hope you’ll continue to enjoy the extensive reprints and associated rarities as much as we enjoy putting them together for you!

We’re Goin’ Way Out (WAY Out) —

— That’s where the fun is, Way Out!

And kudos to those who remember that lift from The Flintstones, but this announcement has nothing to do with the modern Stone Age family … although it does bring good news for fans of adventures set long ago in a galaxy far, far away …

wars

The reactions to our four-volume Tarzan set showed how many of you like Russ Manning’s art. We like it, too, so we’re delighted to tell you that the Star Wars newspaper strip is coming to The Library of American Comics!

Starting in spring of 2017 with the first of a three-volume set, the battles between the Rebel Alliance and the evil Empire will be preserved between hard covers, as initially rendered by Manning (later to be followed by two other popular artists, Alfredo Alcala and Al Williamson), with stories provided by Manning and additional writers including another of our favorites, Steve Gerber (again, later, by the inimitable Archie Goodwin).

I won’t hard-sell you or offer up any corny lines about the Force being with us — I’ll just say we’ve navigated the long and winding path necessary to bring you the Star Wars strips many have requested, and we think you’ll like the results!

But that’s not all …

With Star Wars joining Star Trek and Beyond Mars in our LOAC line-up, there was one other major “space opera” strip we hoped to reprint, and we’re pleased to announce we’re turning those hopes into reality. Ladies and gentlemen, get ready for a trip to the Barnum star system —

hawks

Yes, Star Hawks will also be coming your way, starting in 2017! It’s the brainchild of science fiction author/comics historian Ron Goulart, who teamed with comic book artist extraordinaire Gil Kane to entertain newspaper audiences with lighthearted tales of SFnal derring-do featuring ILS officer Rex Jaxan, his stellar law-enforcement partner Chavez, their robot dog Sniffer, and their boss, the lovely Alice K.  Star Hawks was produced in “two-tier” format — essentially the size of two daily comic strips — which allowed Kane to play with design and panel layout in ways that other newspaper adventure-strip artists could only envy, as shown in this example from the series’s debut :

hawks_2

Kane was recognized by the National Cartoonist Society for his work on Star Hawks, and when Ron Goulart departed the feature Archie Goodwin, Roger McKenzie, and Roger Stern followed him in succession as scripters. The daily also eventually shifted to the standard single-tier format, but ZAM!, Kane’s artwork still looks dynamic, and the fun quotient remains high throughout the life of the strip.

We hope you’ll join us for the LOAC debuts of Star Wars and Star Hawks, in what’s sure to be a science fictional (20)17!

 

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes