Tag Archives | Milton Caniff

The Big Time on the Small Screen

Some readers of our sixth Steve Canyon volume, covering strips published in the years 1957-58, had a question about my text feature for that book. Those inquiries can be summed up with one pithy question: “Where’s the write-up about the Canyon TV show?”

A CANYON ad of the sort that ran in newspapers from coast to coast in the late 1950s.

 

True, that series debuted as part of the NBC 1958 television season, starring Dean Fredericks as Light Colonel Stevenson B. It ran for thirty-four episodes broadcast in 1958-59, and then the ABC network put Canyon into its summer rerun schedule during 1960. (Remember when there was a summer rerun schedule? Seems like ancient history in these days of two hundred channels and streaming video, doesn’t it?)

So I pushed discussion of the show into our upcoming 1959-60 volume, scheduled to be on sale before the end of this year. Why make such a call? It was hardly an inappropriate decision — the show aired more episodes during the ’59-60 period than it did in 1958, after all. There is also an awful lot going on, both in the comic strip and in Milton Caniff’s life, during this particular period, and discussion of the show fits better into the overall flow of the material I’ll cover in Volume 7 than if I had shoehorned it into Volume 6.

Whether you’re a fan of Steve’s television persona or a Caniff fan curious to learn more of this “small screen alternate universe” version of Canyon, rest assured you’ll be getting what I like to think is some pretty nifty coverage when you open up “School for Spies,” Steve Canyon Volume 7, coming your way as the leaves litter the ground. Meanwhile, in addition to that newspaper ad for the series I ran up above, here are some publicity photos related to the series not currently expected to appear in the book, just to whet your appetite for what’s to come …

Dean Fredericks as Steve Canyon, with Milton Caniff showing off his rendering of the actor as his flyboy hero.

 

DEAN F_FFA RECRUITMENT 1

Dean Fredericks with Future Farmers of America (FFA), touring Richards-Gebaur Air Force Base as part of an FFA convention held in Kansas City, Missouri.

 

DEAN F_FFA RECRUITMENT 2

Fredericks adjusts the tie of Air Force recruit Larry King (no not THAT Larry King!) prior to the start of the FFA airbase tour.

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Fredericks is recognized for his Air Force recruitment work by Lieutenant General James Briggs while Milton Caniff looks on and smiles. As Al Capp might phrase it, “What’s good for Dean Fredericks is good for STEVE CANYON!”

Must-See Viewing

What did we chance upon while doing a little on-line research related to our last, Syndicate-centric entry in this space, but this absolutely dee-lightful film of Milton Caniff at work – with Phil Cochran on hand to do a little mugging for the camera, too! Follow this link, scroll to the bottom of the page, then click “Steve Canyon, Terry and the Pirates Cartoonist” for your chance to see the Rembrandt of the Comic Strips wielding his brush …

Also of interest, from three years before Caniff launched Terry, “Newspaper Cartoonists ‘From Trees to Tribunes’.” This 1931 film showcases the folks behind the Chicago Tribune. At roughly the five-minute mark of the feature, you’ll see footage of influential cartoonist John T. McCutcheon, then at around 7:00 you’ll see cartoonists like Sid Smith (The Gumps), Frank (Gasoline Alley) King, and even Harold Gray drawing Little Orphan Annie.

We hope you enjoy these flicker-pictures as much as we did!

 

Rarely-Seen-Its

Amazing, isn’t it, to consider the depth and breadth of material Milton Caniff saved over his long, distinguished career as a newspaperman cartoonist? In my upcoming historical/biographical text for Steve Canyon Volume 4 I note how Milton’s lifetime of collected material formed part of the bedrock for the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum and contribute to the pleasure readers take away from R.C. Harvey’s jam-packed biography of the artist, as well as the Caniff-based shelves within our own Library of American Comics. No matter how many of those artifacts get unearthed and published, there are always other intriguing tidbits that never make it between two covers. Fortunately, we have this space in which to serve up additional Miltonian treats.

Like these, for instance …

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In Terry and the Pirates Volume 3, we discussed Caniff’s showing at Manhattan’s Julien Levy Gallery, complete with photographs taken during the event. Now we’re pleased to present these two images from the actual invitations sent out by the Gallery …

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As one of his first contributions to the War effort following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Caniff offered to do a special Armed Services version of Terry and the Pirates, which quickly morphed into his fondly-recalled Male Call. Above is the letter from Uncle Sam that cemented that deal …

… And as the nation exhaled at the end of World War II, Caniff provided this drawing for a high school yearbook.

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In Steve Canyon Volume 2, I mentioned Milton filling sketchbook pages of spot-art while attending an arts festival in Ramapo, New York. Some of the art, and the newspaper copy that accompanies it, are shown above.

Meanwhile, in Canyon Volume 3, we discussed a special 1951 Christmas drawing Caniff produced at the request of the foreign edition of Stars & Stripes, as well as his agreeing to serve on the board of directors for the Kill Devil Hills Memorial Society. Below: first, a letter to Caniff from Stars & Stripes singing the praises of his effort, followed by an article about Kill Devil Hills that the artist deemed worthy of preserving.

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Finally, upcoming in our next Steve Canyon release, military readers were invited to crack a code designed to attract the attention of our steadfast hero. Here’s an excerpt from Staff Sergeant Arthur G. Buckley’s guess at a solution.

It’s easy to wish that every cartoonist had followed in Milton Caniff’s footsteps and documented his career with such meticulousness and care, but let’s not be greedy. Let’s just be glad that Caniff left behind such complete records for us to enjoy.

 

 

 

Just a month away

Canyon_ads

Next month we celebrate Steve Canyon’s 65th anniversary by releasing the first volume in our new series. Just a few more weeks, folks…

Ooh-la-la

We recently received the second volume of the French edition of the Complete Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates published by BdArtist(e) in Paris. While we were in France during the summer, we also had the pleasure of meeting Nicolas Forsans, the editor of the series, as well as the publishers (and art gallery owners) Jean-Baptiste Barbier and Antoine Mathon. It was well worth taking the metro to Montmartre to meet them and to attend the gallery’s opening of a new show by the phenomenal artist Floc’h.

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The iconic entry to the Montmartre metro station.

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Laughing with editor Nicolas Forsans.

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In front of BdArtist(e) Gallerie with Jean-Baptiste Barbier and Nicolas

Each volume in the French edition includes a delightful homage section in which artists pay their respects to Milton Caniff and his classic creations. Here are just four of these amazing drawings (if you want to see the rest, you’ll have to buy the books!):

HommageClerc

Serge Clerc

HommageAvril_largerFrançoise Avril

HommageBerberianCharles Berberian

HommageFlochFloc’h

Can Never Get Enough

Canifff: A Visual Biography will be on sale in about a month. To hold you over, here are a few more goodies we uncovered. The Dragon Lady color piece is an online extra that didn’t make it in the printed book. This is one of the specialty drawings that Caniff had printed one hundred or so at a time. He would then watercolor them for fans who requested drawings.

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Here’s a party we all wish we could time-travel to: a 1948 comic strip costume ball.

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Here’s a Sunday page that’s not only a classic, but shows how Caniff created the half-page format. He drew the Sundays in tabloid format, then had the panels photostatted and pasted on a horizontal board. Then, either he or one of his assistants would fill in the art to the left and right. The paste-up lines on this original artwork have darkened over the years, giving us a clearer view of the process.Terry_wide

The Caniff View of the LOAC Lineup

In writing about classic comics, I’m always on the lookout for connections—how the events of the day influenced strips (and vice versa), how a cartoonist’s personal life made its way into storylines or inspired certain characters. And of course, how the life of one cartoonist crossed paths with others in various social or professional ways.

That made me look at the list of talent represented by the Library of American Comics line of books and consider the list of connections between them that we have documented since Terry and the Pirates Volume 1 went on sale in the summer of 2007. Because Terry was our first release, because this summer we’ll release our big artbook, Caniff, and because Milton—”Mee-yul-tun,” as his wife, Bunny, used to pronounce his name—was always a social, “clubby” sort, I considered Caniff as we have reprinted him, through the 1946 end of Terry. I wrote his name in the center of a piece of paper, grouped the names of our other artists around him, then started making connections between them.

Here is the picture I drew:

 

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Yes, the details are not perfect—Gray, Capp, Gould, and Jack Kent were all also NCS members, for example, and the post-Terry Caniff has syndicate relationships with other cartoonists that aren’t depicted here—but this struck me as an interesting and useful set of groupings. The version above is also cleaner than my original; here I’ve used simple letters to replace the detailed notes I scribbled next to the arrows and boxes I sketched in amidst my cloud of names. This list describes those connections:

A: Young “Texas” Jack Kent appeared in the Li’l Abner “Advice fo’ Chillun” Sunday gag-panel feature, as shown on page 130 of our Li’l Abner, Volume 2.

B: The two artists swapped occasional letters (with Toth the more eager of the two correspondents), as we’ll discuss in Genius, Illustrated, the companion volume to Genius, Isolated, which will be on sale in a matter of weeks.

C: Kent’s King Aroo and Mills’s Miss Fury were both Bell Syndicate strips.

D: The guiding lights behind Little Orphan Annie and Dick Tracy were correspondents, sometimes gossipy ones, as revealed starting on page 11 of Little Orphan Annie, Volume 5: “The One-Way Road to Justice.”

E:  Blondie, Bringing Up Father, Family Circus, Polly & Her Pals, Secret Agent Corrigan, Flash Gordon, Jungle Jim, and Rip Kirby were all Hearst strips released under the King Features Syndicate banner.

F: Raymond and Williamson were both lauded for their work on Flash Gordon.

Do you see other connections among this group of artists? Drop a line to info@loacomics.comand let us know how you’d revise this picture of the LOAC lineup of talent. It will also be intriguing to watch how the picture grows and changes as we add new releases, including …

Whoops—out of time! Keep watching this space for future announcements!

 

 

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