Tag Archives | Milton Caniff

Rarely-Seen-Its

Amazing, isn’t it, to consider the depth and breadth of material Milton Caniff saved over his long, distinguished career as a newspaperman cartoonist? In my upcoming historical/biographical text for Steve Canyon Volume 4 I note how Milton’s lifetime of collected material formed part of the bedrock for the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum and contribute to the pleasure readers take away from R.C. Harvey’s jam-packed biography of the artist, as well as the Caniff-based shelves within our own Library of American Comics. No matter how many of those artifacts get unearthed and published, there are always other intriguing tidbits that never make it between two covers. Fortunately, we have this space in which to serve up additional Miltonian treats.

Like these, for instance …

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In Terry and the Pirates Volume 3, we discussed Caniff’s showing at Manhattan’s Julien Levy Gallery, complete with photographs taken during the event. Now we’re pleased to present these two images from the actual invitations sent out by the Gallery …

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As one of his first contributions to the War effort following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Caniff offered to do a special Armed Services version of Terry and the Pirates, which quickly morphed into his fondly-recalled Male Call. Above is the letter from Uncle Sam that cemented that deal …

… And as the nation exhaled at the end of World War II, Caniff provided this drawing for a high school yearbook.

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In Steve Canyon Volume 2, I mentioned Milton filling sketchbook pages of spot-art while attending an arts festival in Ramapo, New York. Some of the art, and the newspaper copy that accompanies it, are shown above.

Meanwhile, in Canyon Volume 3, we discussed a special 1951 Christmas drawing Caniff produced at the request of the foreign edition of Stars & Stripes, as well as his agreeing to serve on the board of directors for the Kill Devil Hills Memorial Society. Below: first, a letter to Caniff from Stars & Stripes singing the praises of his effort, followed by an article about Kill Devil Hills that the artist deemed worthy of preserving.

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Finally, upcoming in our next Steve Canyon release, military readers were invited to crack a code designed to attract the attention of our steadfast hero. Here’s an excerpt from Staff Sergeant Arthur G. Buckley’s guess at a solution.

It’s easy to wish that every cartoonist had followed in Milton Caniff’s footsteps and documented his career with such meticulousness and care, but let’s not be greedy. Let’s just be glad that Caniff left behind such complete records for us to enjoy.

 

 

 

Just a month away

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Next month we celebrate Steve Canyon’s 65th anniversary by releasing the first volume in our new series. Just a few more weeks, folks…

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We recently received the second volume of the French edition of the Complete Milton Caniff Terry and the Pirates published by BdArtist(e) in Paris. While we were in France during the summer, we also had the pleasure of meeting Nicolas Forsans, the editor of the series, as well as the publishers (and art gallery owners) Jean-Baptiste Barbier and Antoine Mathon. It was well worth taking the metro to Montmartre to meet them and to attend the gallery’s opening of a new show by the phenomenal artist Floc’h.

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The iconic entry to the Montmartre metro station.

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Laughing with editor Nicolas Forsans.

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In front of BdArtist(e) Gallerie with Jean-Baptiste Barbier and Nicolas

Each volume in the French edition includes a delightful homage section in which artists pay their respects to Milton Caniff and his classic creations. Here are just four of these amazing drawings (if you want to see the rest, you’ll have to buy the books!):

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Serge Clerc

HommageAvril_largerFrançoise Avril

HommageBerberianCharles Berberian

HommageFlochFloc’h

Can Never Get Enough

Canifff: A Visual Biography will be on sale in about a month. To hold you over, here are a few more goodies we uncovered. The Dragon Lady color piece is an online extra that didn’t make it in the printed book. This is one of the specialty drawings that Caniff had printed one hundred or so at a time. He would then watercolor them for fans who requested drawings.

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Here’s a party we all wish we could time-travel to: a 1948 comic strip costume ball.

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Here’s a Sunday page that’s not only a classic, but shows how Caniff created the half-page format. He drew the Sundays in tabloid format, then had the panels photostatted and pasted on a horizontal board. Then, either he or one of his assistants would fill in the art to the left and right. The paste-up lines on this original artwork have darkened over the years, giving us a clearer view of the process.Terry_wide

The Caniff View of the LOAC Lineup

In writing about classic comics, I’m always on the lookout for connections—how the events of the day influenced strips (and vice versa), how a cartoonist’s personal life made its way into storylines or inspired certain characters. And of course, how the life of one cartoonist crossed paths with others in various social or professional ways.

That made me look at the list of talent represented by the Library of American Comics line of books and consider the list of connections between them that we have documented since Terry and the Pirates Volume 1 went on sale in the summer of 2007. Because Terry was our first release, because this summer we’ll release our big artbook, Caniff, and because Milton—”Mee-yul-tun,” as his wife, Bunny, used to pronounce his name—was always a social, “clubby” sort, I considered Caniff as we have reprinted him, through the 1946 end of Terry. I wrote his name in the center of a piece of paper, grouped the names of our other artists around him, then started making connections between them.

Here is the picture I drew:

 

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Yes, the details are not perfect—Gray, Capp, Gould, and Jack Kent were all also NCS members, for example, and the post-Terry Caniff has syndicate relationships with other cartoonists that aren’t depicted here—but this struck me as an interesting and useful set of groupings. The version above is also cleaner than my original; here I’ve used simple letters to replace the detailed notes I scribbled next to the arrows and boxes I sketched in amidst my cloud of names. This list describes those connections:

A: Young “Texas” Jack Kent appeared in the Li’l Abner “Advice fo’ Chillun” Sunday gag-panel feature, as shown on page 130 of our Li’l Abner, Volume 2.

B: The two artists swapped occasional letters (with Toth the more eager of the two correspondents), as we’ll discuss in Genius, Illustrated, the companion volume to Genius, Isolated, which will be on sale in a matter of weeks.

C: Kent’s King Aroo and Mills’s Miss Fury were both Bell Syndicate strips.

D: The guiding lights behind Little Orphan Annie and Dick Tracy were correspondents, sometimes gossipy ones, as revealed starting on page 11 of Little Orphan Annie, Volume 5: “The One-Way Road to Justice.”

E:  Blondie, Bringing Up Father, Family Circus, Polly & Her Pals, Secret Agent Corrigan, Flash Gordon, Jungle Jim, and Rip Kirby were all Hearst strips released under the King Features Syndicate banner.

F: Raymond and Williamson were both lauded for their work on Flash Gordon.

Do you see other connections among this group of artists? Drop a line to info@loacomics.comand let us know how you’d revise this picture of the LOAC lineup of talent. It will also be intriguing to watch how the picture grows and changes as we add new releases, including …

Whoops—out of time! Keep watching this space for future announcements!

 

 

Caniff Rarities

As we’re organizing material for the forthcoming visual biography entitled CANIFF, we’d like to share some choice items that reside in Milton Caniff’s personal collection at The Ohio State University.

Talk about historical artifcats, here the proud cartoonist telegrams his wife: he’s got a strip of his own!

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In addition to the weekly Male Cale strip that Caniff created for the military newspapers during the Second World War, he also provided insignias for dozens upon dozens of American fighting forces units. Here’s one of his comps, circa 1944:

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Never one to miss out on an opportunity for publicity, here we see Caniff drawing the va-va-voom girl, Jayne Mansfield, who was then starring in the film “The Girl Can’t Help It.” Mansfield’s co-star was the nebbishy Tom Ewell, who, the year before, had co-starred in “The Seven-Year Itch” with Marilyn Monroe.

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More Caniff rarities to come, so stay tuned…

Caniff…a Visual Biography

Two days ago, I wrote that there’s no greater thrill than when the first box arrives from the printer with the latest book. A close second is discovering rare artwork or photographs and uncovering new biographical information about a cartoonist. In the case of Polly and Her Pals by Cliff Sterrett, our extensive research culminated in an 8,000-word introduction by Jeet Heer that alters the generally accepted view of Sterrett’s life.

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On our recent foray to The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum at The Ohio State University (how’s that for a mouthful o’ monicker?!), we were primarily looking through the extensive Milton Caniff archives for original artwork and rarely seen items. If you want Caniff, you go to Ohio State; the justly-famous cartoon library was formed on the basis of Caniff depositing his lifetime of artwork and files to his dear alma mater (class of 1930).

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We’re working on the first-ever Milton Caniff artbook, to be published next June. “First ever?” you may ask, with a tinge of doubt. It seems impossible that in a career as well-documented as Milton Caniff’s, there has not been a coffee table artbook dedicated to his work. But there hasn’t. There’s our definitive six-volume Terry and the Pirates, editions of Steve Canyon, Male Call, andDickie Dare, and R.C. Harvey’s phonebook-sized biography—but no artbook.

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Original logo color comps for “Buckeye Boys Ranch.”

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We think of this new project—simply titled Caniff—as not merely an artbook, but a visual biography that will include many examples of original artworks, promotional pieces, background material, and photographs. Some will be familiar to readers (such the “Pilot’s Creed” TerrySunday that was read into the Congressional Record), but presented in a new version (Caniff’s original watercolor of that famous page, which I saw for the first time on this trip!). Other graphics have never or rarely been collected or reprinted.

 

And that’s why we were in Columbus, Ohio—to find undiscovered and unreprinted gems by the most influential cartoonist of all time. And find them we did…with a little help from our friends. Last week Lorraine Turner told you about Matt Tauber donning the white gloves in the research room.

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Matt Tauber looking through Caniff original artwork

This week, we meet one of the unsung heroes in the field of comics research—OSU’s own Susan Liberator, the Keeper of the White Gloves, the Guardian of the Great Works. Along with Lucy Caswell, Jenny Robb, and Marilyn Scott, the indefatigable Susan has been a tremendous help in all of our research at the Cartoon Library—wading through the Noel Sickles papers, the Shel Dorf, Toni Mendez, and Harold Bell collections, and the wide-ranging Caniff archives. Our much-laudedScorchy Smith and the Art of Noel Sickles, as well as Bruce Canwell’s introductions to the Eisner Award-winning Terry series, would have been much poorer without her assistance. And so, a tip of the archivist’s hat to Susan Liberator.

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Who said librarian’s don’t smile?

As we were cataloguing artwork, in walked Jared Gardner, Associate Professor of English at Ohio State, who was looking up something for the history of comics course he teaches. We’re big fans of Jared’s writings about comics on guttergeek and elsewhere; it was a pleasure to meet him and talk a bit about comics criticism, Otto Soglow, and how his 21st-century students respond to such 1920s strips as The Gumps. Here we are admiring the original artwork for one of Caniff’s early drawings for the Columbus Dispatch.

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In the months ahead, we’ll share additional rarities from Caniff, like this one from Harry Guyton, Milton Caniff’s nephew: an original watercolor from the 1940s that Caniff did on a standard number 10 envelope. The “bunny” is Milton’s wife, Esther, and the great dane is Capt. Blaze, named after the red-headed rascal in Terry and the Pirates.

 

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For now, though, I’ve got a date with the Dragon Lady…

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