The Caniff View of the LOAC Lineup

In writing about classic comics, I’m always on the lookout for connections—how the events of the day influenced strips (and vice versa), how a cartoonist’s personal life made its way into storylines or inspired certain characters. And of course, how the life of one cartoonist crossed paths with others in various social or professional ways.

That made me look at the list of talent represented by the Library of American Comics line of books and consider the list of connections between them that we have documented since Terry and the Pirates Volume 1 went on sale in the summer of 2007. Because Terry was our first release, because this summer we’ll release our big artbook, Caniff, and because Milton—”Mee-yul-tun,” as his wife, Bunny, used to pronounce his name—was always a social, “clubby” sort, I considered Caniff as we have reprinted him, through the 1946 end of Terry. I wrote his name in the center of a piece of paper, grouped the names of our other artists around him, then started making connections between them.

Here is the picture I drew:

 

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Yes, the details are not perfect—Gray, Capp, Gould, and Jack Kent were all also NCS members, for example, and the post-Terry Caniff has syndicate relationships with other cartoonists that aren’t depicted here—but this struck me as an interesting and useful set of groupings. The version above is also cleaner than my original; here I’ve used simple letters to replace the detailed notes I scribbled next to the arrows and boxes I sketched in amidst my cloud of names. This list describes those connections:

A: Young “Texas” Jack Kent appeared in the Li’l Abner “Advice fo’ Chillun” Sunday gag-panel feature, as shown on page 130 of our Li’l Abner, Volume 2.

B: The two artists swapped occasional letters (with Toth the more eager of the two correspondents), as we’ll discuss in Genius, Illustrated, the companion volume to Genius, Isolated, which will be on sale in a matter of weeks.

C: Kent’s King Aroo and Mills’s Miss Fury were both Bell Syndicate strips.

D: The guiding lights behind Little Orphan Annie and Dick Tracy were correspondents, sometimes gossipy ones, as revealed starting on page 11 of Little Orphan Annie, Volume 5: “The One-Way Road to Justice.”

E:  Blondie, Bringing Up Father, Family Circus, Polly & Her Pals, Secret Agent Corrigan, Flash Gordon, Jungle Jim, and Rip Kirby were all Hearst strips released under the King Features Syndicate banner.

F: Raymond and Williamson were both lauded for their work on Flash Gordon.

Do you see other connections among this group of artists? Drop a line to info@loacomics.comand let us know how you’d revise this picture of the LOAC lineup of talent. It will also be intriguing to watch how the picture grows and changes as we add new releases, including …

Whoops—out of time! Keep watching this space for future announcements!

 

 

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